Dry Good Friday

Discuss church-state separation issues that are relevant in Ireland.
Ygern
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Dry Good Friday

Post by Ygern » Thu Sep 11, 2008 10:32 am

I was heartened to read about a sensible decision in the Irish Times today.

Essentially, Galway gardaí brought charges against several restaurants for serving wine along with their meals on Good Friday. Judge Fahy said:
If people want to go out for a meal on Good Friday I would have thought they could have a drink with their meal. Technically you [the Garda inspector] are correct, but I think myself it is absolutely ludicrous that people on holidays especially cannot have a glass of wine with their meal.
Some of the drink laws in this country bug me. I often do my grocery shopping early on Sunday morning, and its damned inconvenient to be prohibited from purchasing a bottle of wine until 12.

I never really understand the rationale behind alcohol prohibition laws, particularly the Sunday morning one. What do the rest of you think?
FXR
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Re: Dry Good Friday

Post by FXR » Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:56 pm

Ygern wrote: I was heartened to read about a sensible decision in the Irish Times today.

Essentially, Galway gardaí brought charges against several restaurants for serving wine along with their meals on Good Friday. Judge Fahy said:
If people want to go out for a meal on Good Friday I would have thought they could have a drink with their meal. Technically you [the Garda inspector] are correct, but I think myself it is absolutely ludicrous that people on holidays especially cannot have a glass of wine with their meal.
Some of the drink laws in this country bug me. I often do my grocery shopping early on Sunday morning, and its damned inconvenient to be prohibited from purchasing a bottle of wine until 12.

I never really understand the rationale behind alcohol prohibition laws, particularly the Sunday morning one. What do the rest of you think?

This "good" (sic) Friday BS always gets on my wick. It's the imposition of superstition on everybody else. If I never drank or ate meat I'd do it on that Friday. It's always blithely ignored that the night before most off licences will look like Croke Park on the day of the all Ireland. It's another sign of the Catholic Vatican dominated backwater this is.
Human communication is a very rickety rope bridge between minds. Its too narrow to allow but a few thoughts to cross at a time. Many are lost in the chasms of noise, suspicion, misinterpretation and shooting the message through dislike of the messenger.
electromag
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Re: Dry Good Friday

Post by electromag » Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:32 pm

FXR wrote: It's the imposition of superstition on everybody else.
I agree. How happy would the majority Christian population of Ireland be if we banned pork because it offended Irish Muslims? Pandering to such nonsense doesn't just inconvenience people it sets a really bad precedent. Its akin to saying "Sorry- the irrational beliefs of the many trump the rights of the few". How can Ireland criticize foreign countries for persecuting religious groups or exercising theocracy, when our laws are biased as well?

Its about time we shrugged off the influence of the church and rid our country of ridiculous laws which should never have been passed in the first place.

Electromag
inedifix
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Re: Dry Good Friday

Post by inedifix » Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:41 pm

Ygern wrote:I never really understand the rationale behind alcohol prohibition laws, particularly the Sunday morning one. What do the rest of you think?
I'm pretty sure the Sunday morning one goes back to times when men shuffled guiltily from the pub to mass on Sunday morning and swayed drunkenly at the back of the church, punctuating the priest's sermons with intermittent flatulent outbursts and upsetting all the pious people.

But the Good Friday one kind of takes the biscuit. That ban has resulted in the biggest binge-drink fest on the Calendar. Have these people not heard of reverse psychology?

I
“What we call chaos is just patterns we haven't recognized. What we call random is just patterns we can't decipher. What we can't understand we call nonsense. There is no free will. There are no variables. There is only the inevitable.” Chuck Palahniuk
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Re: Dry Good Friday

Post by FXR » Thu Sep 11, 2008 2:17 pm

inedifix wrote: But the Good Friday one kind of takes the biscuit. That ban has resulted in the biggest binge-drink fest on the Calendar. Have these people not heard of reverse psychology?I
Assuming that the ban is against selling alcohol wouldn’t it be a marvellous exercise to distribute tickets to an open air free booze and sausage get together in O'Connell St. on the Friday. It could be advertised as the "Screw You and Your Ban" fest.
Human communication is a very rickety rope bridge between minds. Its too narrow to allow but a few thoughts to cross at a time. Many are lost in the chasms of noise, suspicion, misinterpretation and shooting the message through dislike of the messenger.
Ygern
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Post by Ygern » Thu Sep 11, 2008 2:27 pm

Heh! Wouldn't that be fun.

On the other hand, I am all for supporting a ban on Catholics buying alcohol on Sunday morning or their holy days.

You can imagine how well that would go down as a suggestion...

But it is a bit stupid. No-one expects Jews to be offended at everyone else buying alcohol & doing business on the Sabbath. Why should Catholics get preferential treatment?

Has the governement put forward any secular rationale for these bans?
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Post by FXR » Thu Sep 11, 2008 2:55 pm

Ygern wrote: Heh! Wouldn't that be fun.

On the other hand, I am all for supporting a ban on Catholics buying alcohol on Sunday morning or their holy days.
You can imagine how well that would go down as a suggestion.
If I enter a Mosque, which I recently did, I'll take off my shoes. On the other hand if the Moslems got the government to pass a law that you had to take off your shoes when you enter my house I'd tell them where to shove it. The Gick (I've renamed it) Friday thing is the same. So you think because of some Iron Age event you should not dring on a certain day well good for you. But no, Herr Ratzingers instructions have to be imposed on everybody else not just the followers.

That's the thing: there is nothing, in theory, to stop Catholics following the instructions of their CEO in Rome. No one would make a law telling Catholics they had to have an abortion even in cases of rape or etopic pregnancies.

They fall down when they want to impose their views by law on everybody proving once again (and I love putting this to them) that the Vatican has no faith in Catholicism.
Ygern wrote:Has the governement put forward any secular rationale for these bans?
Hello! Are you in Ireland :lol:
Last edited by FXR on Thu Sep 11, 2008 4:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Ygern
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Post by Ygern » Thu Sep 11, 2008 3:11 pm

I'm going to use the No-TV defence :lol:

I would have thought that someone in government would have come up with a half-baked, utterly unconvincing, 'for the good of the children' reason for forcing shops to barricade their liquor aisles for a few hours once a week. I mean, that's what we pay them their huge paychecks for, isn't it?
FXR
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Post by FXR » Thu Sep 11, 2008 4:11 pm

Ygern wrote:I'm going to use the No-TV defence :lol:

I would have thought that someone in government would have come up with a half-baked, utterly unconvincing, 'for the good of the children' reason for forcing shops to barricade their liquor aisles for a few hours once a week. I mean, that's what we pay them their huge paychecks for, isn't it?
Maybe you should buy a TV, I've got a spare on where do you want me to send it :lol:

This is the way it works: the government is riddled with publicans, their cousins, uncles and brothers. Remember Mick McDowell tried to bring in a law selling a cheap licence so cafes could sell beer? He got strung up by the publicans lobby.
The law seemingly dropped in out of nowhere closing off licences at ten is meant of give people a shove back towards the pub. For over a year they've been humming and hawing about child protection legislation but helping pubs: zingo no argument it's passed.

Also you’re mistaken when you claim we pay our politicians huge pay packets. We don't, they pay themselves with our money and we don't get a say.
Human communication is a very rickety rope bridge between minds. Its too narrow to allow but a few thoughts to cross at a time. Many are lost in the chasms of noise, suspicion, misinterpretation and shooting the message through dislike of the messenger.
Ygern
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Post by Ygern » Thu Sep 11, 2008 4:33 pm

FXR wrote:
Maybe you should buy a TV, I've got a spare
Thank you for your kind offer, but NOOOOO! I find the incessant adverts almost like torture or persecution. I love NOT having one.
FXR wrote: Also you’re mistaken when you claim we pay our politicians huge pay packets. We don't, they pay themselves with our money and we don't get a say.
Ah well, they work so hard for us after all... you wouldn't begrudge them their modest earnings, their expense accounts, first class plane tickets when private jets can't be found, seemingly endless holidays, strange fetishist obsession with imported silk shirts...
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