Should St Patricks day be stopped

Discuss church-state separation issues that are relevant in Ireland.
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Should St Patricks day be stopped

Yes turn pictures of Mr.Paddy (Succat) upsidedown.
4
22%
No St.Patrick was a great fellow, its a nice day out in mid-March
5
28%
Don't care I just want to get drunk
9
50%
 
Total votes: 18
aZerogodist
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Should St Patricks day be stopped

Post by aZerogodist » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:17 am

Now I thought of this by way of analogy to the Muslims complaining about being offended by sausage and contraceptives &..&..&...
Anyway I was thinking of illuminating the absurdity of Atheists being offended by say, christian names, thenSt Paddy came to mind. Like he is attributed with bringing the wretched religion into Ireland, so Paddy’s day should almost be a day of protest, but I do enjoy the day though, and it usually is bitter cold so not the best protest day.
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Last edited by aZerogodist on Fri Jan 23, 2009 7:22 am, edited 2 times in total.
bipedalhumanoid
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Post by bipedalhumanoid » Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:14 am

No more than we should ban Christmas. Christmas and paddy's day have become secular. Sure if you wanted to you could turn it into something religious. You could go to church on that day or whatever but the vast majority of people don't think of religion when they think of st Patrick's day.
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Post by CelticAtheist » Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:16 am

St Patricks Day is all about drowning the Shamrock and fleecing the Yanks for their hard earned cash, to the absolute disgust of the RCC.
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Post by DollarLama » Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:18 am

St Patrick's day was originally a religious celebration, then it morphed into a celebration of irish catholic nationalism, and now it's become a kind of secular carnival, falling at about the same time as the christian carnival but not linked to lent in the same way.
"Religious belief of all kinds shares the same intellectual respectability, evidential base, and rationality as belief in the existence of fairies." AC Grayling
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Post by bipedalhumanoid » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:44 pm

Actually I distinctly remember hearing some debate on newstalk including a very religious person who was disgusted that people were more and more commonly referring to it as "paddy's day" rather than Saint Patrick's day. Mainly because it removes the religious connotations from the name. So if you want to piss off the church on this day you know what to do :lol:
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Post by nozzferrahhtoo » Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:12 pm

Its a bank holiday but after that the non religious are not impacted in any way, so there is no point targetting it.

You would do better to find a day where the non religious in us suffer or in some way are set back by it.

The no alchohol laws of Good Friday would be a good example here. Just because the memoids of the catholic faith are against drinking on that day does NOT mean I have to be denied drink too.

To use vaugely legal terms then, if you want to attack a religious celebration attack one where you have a kind of "standing". Where you are in some way impacted by it.
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Post by Ygern » Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:35 pm

It always amuses me when one of the 3 people in Ireland who actually sees Paddy's Day as a serious religious holy day makes some sort of public complaint about the lack of respect that the saint is getting.

The looks they get in return from everybody (sort of 'Oh look, a UFO') are really all that needs to be said.

I'm not Irish, so the day is doubly meaningless to me - but any day that means I get to lie in bed til 10am is alright by me.
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Post by bipedalhumanoid » Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:52 pm

Ygern wrote:
I'm not Irish, so the day is doubly meaningless to me - but any day that means I get to lie in bed til 10am is alright by me.

I'm not Irish either... nor do I have any Irish blood but I still used to celebrate paddy's day when I was living in Australia. We have parades and everything. Great excuse to spend some time in Dooley's 8)
DollarLama
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Post by DollarLama » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:38 pm

bipedalhumanoid wrote:I still used to celebrate paddy's day when I was living in Australia. We have parades and everything. Great excuse to spend some time in Dooley's 8)
too right, mate! 8)
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Post by FXR » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:42 pm

bipedalhumanoid wrote:Actually I distinctly remember hearing some debate on newstalk including a very religious person who was disgusted that people were more and more commonly referring to it as "paddy's day" rather than Saint Patrick's day. Mainly because it removes the religious connotations from the name. So if you want to piss off the church on this day you know what to do :lol:
We should seriously consider a strong campaign to have the day officially renamed Paddies day to reflect reality and to foster tolerance and inclusion.

The day could be the last Monday in March which would appeal to business and punters because Monday is the least productive day of the week and everyone would be guaranteed a long weekend every year.

If you did a country wide survey asking people if the day should be renamed and if it eventually was, bishops would be jumping off spires.
Last edited by FXR on Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Human communication is a very rickety rope bridge between minds. Its too narrow to allow but a few thoughts to cross at a time. Many are lost in the chasms of noise, suspicion, misinterpretation and shooting the message through dislike of the messenger.
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