Your Political Compass

Discuss Irish and International politics
benroe
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by benroe » Mon Jun 14, 2010 7:45 pm

So i'm not the 15th reincarnation of Sonam Gyatso?
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Dev
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by Dev » Mon Jun 14, 2010 7:51 pm

Ygern wrote: So far we can say that we seem to vary a fair bit in their economic opinions but we are all anti-authoritarian.
I wonder if this is the case for all atheists or disbelievers?
I had the same observation.

It does make sense to suggest it, take us Irish atheists on this forum. Our biggest gripe from what I've gathered isn't actually the the irrationality of religion but rather the authority of which it wields.

We've never taken people who believe in ghosts seriously but we take the religious seriously. The difference being the perceived authority of the two.

I don't mean to speak on behalf of anyone, I'm just going on what I've observed here.

Bik wrote:4 down 9 left for me.
Are you a communist? Genuine question and not an accusation, thats just very far left.
Last edited by Dev on Mon Jun 14, 2010 7:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by dugges » Mon Jun 14, 2010 7:53 pm

I'm not too far behind Dev, and there is nobody famous to go by.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by Ygern » Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:03 pm

Just a clarification: socialism isn't the same as communism.

The left / right thing being measured here refers to the economic policy you favour rather than the political one. Communism encompasses both political & economic policies; socialism refers more just to economic policies.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-dif ... munism.htm
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Dev
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by Dev » Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:27 pm

Ygern wrote:I'm kind of sceptical about their "famous names" chart. These individuals did not actually take the test, so these results are what someone else *thought* their responses would be.
I'm still skeptical as to the qualifications of the people behind this it would be nice to see:

Joe Bloggs B.A., p.H.D
Jane Doe MP

I'm confident that politicians and statesmen would have a strong written record (autobiographies, letters, campaign policies, biographies and voting records) to accurately suggest what they would have been in favour of. However thats quite a bit of homework but it is plausible if given them the benefit of the doubt. The professional feedback and FAQ are worth a skim though, it does seem many people deem there to be some degree of accuracy. I'm inclined to treat it like an IQ test.

I've known about this site for a few years now. The questions haven't changed. What is interesting to see is how as the years roll on and you become exposed to new arguments and information, your co-ordinates change slightly.

Funny question in the FAQ - Americans can't seem to get out of the top right quadrant. :lol:

I've seen this posted on other forums, whats astonished me is how we are all pretty much on the same social plane (-4 to -6). Other forums seem to have more varied replies.
Ygern wrote:Just a clarification: socialism isn't the same as communism.

The left / right thing being measured here refers to the economic policy you favour rather than the political one. Communism encompasses both political & economic policies; socialism refers more just to economic policies.
Fair point. I should have observed if Bik was a communist he'd be much higher up in the graph. Not that anyones political ideology bothers or anything. I'm sure everyone has good reasons for believing what they do.

Thats one thing I've observed about political ideologies - there are no right or wrong answers just different preferences.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by Ygern » Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:45 pm

I agree that one could make a reasonable guess at where certain public figures might be on the grid, but it still relies very heavily on reputation & public perception. The Dalai Lama is not quite as anti-authority as this grid would have you believe. I mean, sure, he's anti authoritarian rule in the form of the Chinese government. But he is himself an hereditary king appointed by heaven - the epitome of an authority figure.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by mkaobrih » Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:10 pm

Where is the don’t care option? Strongly disagree, disagree, don’t care, agree, strongly agree, would be a bit more accurate. I came out in the third quadrant but I was not happy with the questions and suggested answers.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by Dev » Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:14 pm

mkaobrih wrote:Where is the don’t care option? Strongly disagree, disagree, don’t care, agree, strongly agree, would be a bit more accurate. I came out in the third quadrant but I was not happy with the questions and suggested answers.
I know where you're coming from; there are limitations and imperfections. Certain propositions for instance:

"A significant advantage of a one-party state is that it avoids all the arguments that delay progress in a democratic political system."

Some might agree that this is true but would never support a one party state and would feel conflicted about giving an answer for fear it might imply they would support such a regime in their answer.

People seem inclined to think of such systems or ideologies as simply outright bad like and don't feel comfortable that upon objective reflection that rather even conventional tyrannical institutions like Nazism or slavery may have advantages.

In short acknowledging something has an advantage doesn't mean you support it.

There were harder ones though.

"If economic globalisation is inevitable, it should primarily serve humanity rather than the interests of trans-national corporations."

This one I found personally tricky as I'm inclined to think that for all their mistakes and bad deeds the existence of multi-nationals is on the whole good for humanity and don't see the terms being completely at odds with each other. However I did pick up that it was looking for some priority response of the two terms.

I'm not 100% what the purpose of this question was. I just placed "Strongly Agree".

There is an answer to this in the FAQ.
This one sometimes ruffles feathers on right wings. What the proposition actually suggests is that humanity should be the priority.

Critics argue that there's no conflict of interest. Transnational corporations naturally and unfailingly serve humanity by serving themselves. In enriching business, the argument goes, globalisation will always subsequently benefit humanity. Prioritising humanity would only limit the ability of the corporations to inevitably do greater good. So advocates of this trickle down approach should simply click 'strongly disagree' We don't see the problem.

The record, however, makes clear that there have often been spectacular conflicts of interest between coporate enrichment and humantity. Halliburton, Enron and the tobacco industry's research cover-ups are perhaps the best known examples. Others are detailed at The 10 Worst Corporations of 2008 and Corpwatch.org .

On the other hand, for the comparatively few who tell us that corporations can never serve humanity, Milton Friedman argues the case for unfettered market forces.
Basically don't worry about humanity - globalization is good for it no matter what. However placing it in a lower priority would only serve to retard the benefits multinationals can offer humanity.

I'm not convinced and still stand by my original reply. If anyone has any opinons or arguments to elaborate on this I'd like to hear them.

Out of curiosity which questions would you have replied "don't care", I found all of them to be relevant to either a persons social outlook or economic one.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by Ygern » Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:34 pm

A question that made me hesitate the longest was the second one about criminal justice.
First they ask whether it should be about punishment or rehabilitation (ok, clear enough - but misses out on options like protecting society)
Then they ask whether you think it is a waste of time to try to rehabilitate some criminals. That's not so clear. In some cases it is quite possible that someone is impossible to rehabilitate. For example, a sociopath probably falls into this category, especially given that psychiatric medicine is still in its infancy. But even if you know you are doomed to fail with some doesn't really give society a license to not try.

In spite of that, I think the results of this quiz are more or less correct - no-one here has been surprised or horrified at their result.
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Re: Your Political Compass

Post by MichaelNugent » Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:26 am

I did this some years ago. From memory, I was near the centre on the economic scale, and about midway down the bottom half on the social scale. As Ygern suggests, I thought it was on balance relatively close to my self-perception of my position, despite having concerns about some of the specific questions.
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