Motivational speaker

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Dr Raskolnikov
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Location: "In the beginning there was the word, and the word was "word up biatch""

Re: Motivational speaker

Post by Dr Raskolnikov » Wed May 25, 2011 1:21 pm

mkaobrih wrote:
aiseiri47 wrote:
"There's no harm in being open-minded, so long as you're not so open minded that your brain falls out". I'm afraid I can't find an original attribution for that one..."
I've heard Dawkins use it, but I think there are several variations of it from various sources; it's a good one, though. It's one of those rare quotes that really speaks for itself.
I thought it was Carl Sagan's quote - Tim Minchin has a song about it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFO6ZhUW38w
I love Minchin's songs. Have you heard "Storm"?

I thought it was Sagan too, or maybe Feynman, but I wasn't sure. They both probably said it at some point but I'd be interested to trace the original attribution. I found a website that suggests it was someone called Max Radin in 1937 in the Yale Law Journal, where he said:

"Practical gentlemen have a number of bitterly sarcastical comments on persons whose minds are so open that their brains fall out".

Even this indicates that other forms of the saying were around even earlier, so it seems that the case must remain open for now!
Science is like a blabbermouth who ruins the movie by telling you how it ends. Well, I say there are some things we don't want to know. Important things. - Ned Flanders
DaithiDublin
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Re: Motivational speaker

Post by DaithiDublin » Wed May 25, 2011 2:41 pm

Dr Raskolnikov wrote:I found a website that suggests it was someone called Max Radin in 1937 in the Yale Law Journal, where he said:

"Practical gentlemen have a number of bitterly sarcastical comments on persons whose minds are so open that their brains fall out".

Even this indicates that other forms of the saying were around even earlier, so it seems that the case must remain open for now!
Another beautifully random forum tangent! I'm on it now, too. Last one to find the source is a dirty Christian! :lol:
As yet I have not found a single case of a terrestrial animal which fertilises itself.

- Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species
(he obviously never went to Bray)
DaithiDublin
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Re: Motivational speaker

Post by DaithiDublin » Wed May 25, 2011 4:10 pm

Well, I'm not working today, and I love a bit of research..

There are lots of variations, some about a mind too open stuff can fall out and others warning of stuff falling in.

The phrase open minded itself appears around 1820.
The earliest form of our one that I can find is a quote from The Note-Books of Samuel Butler. Butler died in 1902, but the note-books weren't published until 1912.
Samuel Butler wrote:Cursed is he that does not know when to shut his mind. An open mind is all very well in its way, but it ought not to be so open that there is no keeping anything in or out of it. It should be capable of shutting its doors sometimes, or it may be found a little draughty.
The full book is available online:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6173.txt.utf8

I'm delighted with this, because I read butler's Erewhon yonks ago and it's high time I read some more of him. He was a great fan of Darwin's theory of evolution, but he was a supporter of neo-Lamarckism (that traits acquired by an individual in it's lifetime were passed down) over natural selection. I'll forgive him that, he just shut the doors on his mind a little early, but he did come up with one of my favourite quotes ever:
Samuel Butler wrote:Exploring is delightful to look forward to and back upon, but it is not comfortable at the time, unless it be of such an easy nature as not to deserve the name.

And I've said nothing about stiff arms... :wink:
As yet I have not found a single case of a terrestrial animal which fertilises itself.

- Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species
(he obviously never went to Bray)
Dr Raskolnikov
Posts: 197
Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2009 11:16 pm
Location: "In the beginning there was the word, and the word was "word up biatch""

Re: Motivational speaker

Post by Dr Raskolnikov » Wed May 25, 2011 5:42 pm

DaithiDublin wrote:Well, I'm not working today, and I love a bit of research..

There are lots of variations, some about a mind too open stuff can fall out and others warning of stuff falling in.

The phrase open minded itself appears around 1820.
The earliest form of our one that I can find is a quote from The Note-Books of Samuel Butler. Butler died in 1902, but the note-books weren't published until 1912.
Samuel Butler wrote:Cursed is he that does not know when to shut his mind. An open mind is all very well in its way, but it ought not to be so open that there is no keeping anything in or out of it. It should be capable of shutting its doors sometimes, or it may be found a little draughty.
The full book is available online:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6173.txt.utf8

I'm delighted with this, because I read butler's Erewhon yonks ago and it's high time I read some more of him. He was a great fan of Darwin's theory of evolution, but he was a supporter of neo-Lamarckism (that traits acquired by an individual in it's lifetime were passed down) over natural selection. I'll forgive him that, he just shut the doors on his mind a little early, but he did come up with one of my favourite quotes ever:
Samuel Butler wrote:Exploring is delightful to look forward to and back upon, but it is not comfortable at the time, unless it be of such an easy nature as not to deserve the name.

And I've said nothing about stiff arms... :wink:
Good work Daithí! :)

Did you know that Lamarckism is making a comeback, repackaged as epigenetics... it's not a rival to natural selection of course, just an add-on.
Science is like a blabbermouth who ruins the movie by telling you how it ends. Well, I say there are some things we don't want to know. Important things. - Ned Flanders
DaithiDublin
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Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 6:15 pm
Location: Bray, Co. Wicklow
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Re: Motivational speaker

Post by DaithiDublin » Wed May 25, 2011 8:42 pm

Dr Raskolnikov wrote:Did you know that Lamarckism is making a comeback, repackaged as epigenetics... it's not a rival to natural selection of course, just an add-on.
Apparently I did. :? Dawkins talks about it at length in the Doomed Rivals chapter of The Blind Watchmaker. (He says after briefly scanning it and deciding he's way too tired for that kind of thing and could do with opening a beer and zonking out in front of the telly. Sure, he's even talking about himself in the third person!)

Thanks for the tip, I'll follow that up tomorrow. ;¬)
As yet I have not found a single case of a terrestrial animal which fertilises itself.

- Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species
(he obviously never went to Bray)
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